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6/18/2020

Four tax filing tools from the IRS

Four resources to help you tool up for tax time

With this year’s July 15 federal tax deadline rapidly approaching, the time to prepare is now.

To help you, the IRS has a full suite of easy-to-use, online tools that enable you to file and pay taxes, get tax account data and find clear, concise answers to questions. Let’s take a closer look at four of them.

1. IRS Free File

  • IRS Free File gives you a choice of 10 brand-name tax preparation software packages. It’s free to those who earned $69,000 or less in 2019.
  • You can use Free File fillable forms regardless of your income. They’re electronic versions of paper IRS forms, so you can file online and avoid a trip to the post office. 
  • If you need more time, you can even file for an extension online. You must pay your estimated tax by July 15 in order to get the filing extension.

2. Payment options

  • Go to IRS.gov and choose the “pay” tab. You’ll see several options for payment.
  • Use IRS Direct Pay for fast, free and secure electronic payments from your bank account to the U.S. Treasury.
  • Make credit, debit card or digital wallet payments through an approved payment processor using IRS Direct Pay or the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System. A fee of $3.99 per account filing applies.
  • Pay by cash at a participating retail store

3. Answers to your questions

4. Tax account information

  • The view your account tool provides information such as balance owed for each tax year and payment history up to 24 months. 
  • The get transcript function lets you view, print and download your tax transcripts after the IRS has processed your return. 
  • For refund information, use Where’s My Refund? on IRS.gov and the official mobile app, IRS2Go. You’ll see information within 24 hours after the IRS acknowledges receipt of your e-filed return.

Remember, for official information go directly and solely to IRS.gov. When it comes to federal taxes, they literally wrote the book.

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